Addiction and substance use disorder | Treatment

Addiction and substance use disorder | Treatment

Addiction and substance use disorder are serious issues that have a negative impact on the lives of those who experience them, as well as their loved ones. The addiction may be to drugs or alcohol, but also gambling, sex, food… even work. Substance abuse refers to the misuse of substances such as prescription medications or illegal drugs. There are many treatments for substance abuse available today that can help people recover from these very difficult conditions. In this blog post we will discuss substance use disorders and addiction with its treatment options!

What is substance use disorder?

Substance use disorder (SUD) is a complicated illness in which a person uses a substance in an uncontrolled manner despite negative consequences. The substance of choice may be alcohol, marijuana or another drug.

SUD is a primary disease. This means it isn’t caused by something else such as mental illness or personality disorder and the substance use itself doesn’t result from other medical conditions (for example, Parkinson’s disease). SUD becomes an addiction when cravings for drugs become uncontrollable and the substance is used compulsively.

What is substance use disorder

When a person has SUD, it’s difficult for them to imagine life without using drugs or alcohol. They may be preoccupied with using substances and spend most of their time thinking about how to get more. When they stop drinking or taking drugs, withdrawal symptoms can make them feel ill, shaky, or anxious.

People with substance use disorder are at high risk for accidents and injuries because their judgment is impaired when they take the substance. They may also put themselves in risky situations, such as driving while intoxicated or having unprotected sex.

SUD treatment includes medications to reduce cravings and promote abstinence along with psychosocial therapies that can help people understand substance use and develop new habits.

Symptoms of substance use disorder

Symptoms of substance use disorder are grouped into four categories:

  1. Impaired control: a craving or strong urge to use the substanc
  2. Social problems: using more than intended or having difficulty fulfilling major role obligations at work, school, or home because of substance us
  3. Risky use: risky behaviors or continued use despite recurrent physical or psychological problems associated with its use, and drug effects (tolerance, withdrawal symptoms) when drug use is stopped. Many people who have substance abuse also suffer from another mental illness
  4. Drug effects: tolerance (the need for increased amounts of the drug over time to have the same effect) and withdrawal symptoms when drug use is stopped or cut back.

How Is Substance Use Disorder Treated?

Recognizing the problem is the first step. Some people have a problem with substance use but don’t realize it. Once you have identified that there is a problem, then treatment can begin.

Treatment for SUD varies depending on the type of drug being abused and other factors such as age, overall health etc… Treatment may involve counseling or attending support groups to help overcome addiction. Group therapy sessions are also available for individuals who have a substance use disorder.

The most common types of treatment include: medication, outpatient care and/or inpatient care depending on the severity of addiction. Some people require only short term treatments while others may need long-term or even lifetime treatment to overcome their drug abuse problem.

People suffering from an SUD are at increased risk of injuring themselves or someone else, contracting infectious diseases such as HIV/AIDS and hepatitis C from shared needles.

A thorough physical examination should be conducted by a medical professional to determine whether or not a substance use disorder exists. A psychiatric assessment will be performed to identify if the individual has any co-occurring mental health disorders.

A physical and psychological evaluation is necessary in order to assess all factors that may contribute to an SUD such as: social, environmental and biological causes. Substance abuse can lead to serious withdrawal symptoms when someone stops using drugs or alcohol . Withdrawal symptoms can be physical and psychological.

Withdrawal is the body’s reaction to the lack of a drug or alcohol after an individual has become physically dependent on it. Symptoms vary depending on what substance they were using but some common withdrawal symptoms include: depression, mood swings, restlessness, anxiety , fatigue, irritability etc…

Some drugs have been known to cause seizures and/or a condition called delirium tremens. Delerium Tremens is characterized by vivid hallucinations, confusion, fever , rapid heart rate and disorientation .

Severity of withdrawal symptoms depends on the type of drug being abused as well as how long they have been abusing it for. Those with a substance use disorder should never attempt to detox on their own without medical supervision.

Withdrawal can cause serious health problems including death if it is not medically supervised and monitored by a doctor or other qualified healthcare professional.

Detoxification refers to the initial period of stopping drug or alcohol abuse . During this time, an individual will experience withdrawal symptoms. Medical detox is necessary for some people especially if they are addicted to substances that can cause seizures or delirium tremens.

Treatment options during medical detox may include medications such as anti-nausea drugs, analgesics (pain relievers), antidepressants and/or benzodiazepines . Benzodiazepines help control the symptoms of anxiety, insomnia and seizures. They are prescribed for a limited period of time to manage withdrawal symptoms during detoxification .

After medical detox is complete, the next step would be rehabilitation where individuals receive counseling or attend support groups in order to help them overcome drug addiction. Addiction can cause changes in the brain which makes it difficult for someone suffering from an SUD to stop using drugs or alcohol by themselves.

For some people, rehabilitation may involve attending a residential treatment center where they can live at the facility and receive around-the-clock care while undergoing intensive therapy sessions . Residential facilities provide privacy as well as comfortable living conditions for those who need it most. A majority of these centers have support groups that addicts can attend after they leave the facility.

Most people with an SUD are highly motivated to recover from their addiction because of how it affects every aspect of their lives including relationships, family and career . The desire to quit abusing drugs or alcohol in order to improve one’s physical health is also a strong incentive for many individuals. If someone does not have a strong motivation to stop, they may not succeed in overcoming addiction.

Mental health disorders such as depression and anxiety can affect an individual’s ability to avoid substance abuse . Unfortunately there is still a stigma attached to mental illness which means many people do not seek help because of the fear or rejection from others. There also needs to be more research done in order to discover new medications for mental health disorders.

Successful addiction recovery requires long-term treatment and support from family members, peers, healthcare professionals or other addicts who are willing to share their stories with others . It is also important that an individual does not lose hope when they relapse because this can happen even after years of sobriety.

An estimated 16.72 million people aged 12 or older needed treatment for an illicit drug or alcohol use problem in 2014 .

Both drugs and alcohol have a long list of negative effects that are generally recognized. but it is important to remember that these substances can have a devastating effect on the brain. If you or someone you care about suffers from an addiction, don’t wait another day. Contact us today for more information so we can help guide you through your options to overcome this disease together. Recovery is possible with long-term treatment and support from loved ones who will encourage them when they relapse.

ADHD in toddlers

ADHD in toddlers

The number of young children being diagnosed with ADHD (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder) has been steadily increasing by the year. This increase has been accompanied by a lot of debate, as some have questioned whether or not all these children are truly suffering from this psychological disorder and how it should be treated. In any case, there is no doubt that it is easier to diagnose a child as having ADHD than an adult. Some have even questioned whether there are some cases where misdiagnosis has occurred, but it is generally agreed upon that the main causes for this disorder are biological and influenced by environmental factors.

ADHD symptoms in toddlers.

The symptoms of ADHD are not often noticed before the child is three years old. Parents who have one or more children with ADHD notice that their toddler tends to be fidgety, hyperactive, and extremely impulsive. The difference between if they are a boy or girl with ADHD becomes more apparent at this age as well. Boys will become hyperactive and girls will become impulsive.

Some of the symptoms of ADHD in toddlers may include:

-Inability to control impulses or anger-Extreme lack of focus, combined with restlessness and hyperactivity-Inappropriate behavior due to poor impulse control such as telling a stranger personal information, grabbing things out of another person’s hand without permission, and grabbing toys from other children-Talking excessively and not allowing anyone else to talk or be heard-Constantly interrupting conversations and ignoring instructions, such as running away when told to stop

***

4 year old with adhd.

Research says ADHD isn’t seen in children under age 4, but many parents of young children with ADHD disagree.

“Many misdiagnosed 4 year olds are actually suffering from undiagnosed ADHD.”

ADHD is very real, and it’s nothing that you should be ashamed of. There are thousands of children every day that struggle and fight with ADHD and it needs to be known that ADHD can affect children as young as four years old.

Everyone has their own unique personalities and traits, and some people express those more than others, and ADHD is the same way. People who live with ADHD often deal with a lot of stress and frustration because it simply feels like they aren’t doing anything right, which makes it even harder to focus on what they are supposed to do.

preschoolers with adhd.

ADHD is often diagnosed in children starting from the age of three. In many cases, this diagnosis can be made on a child’s birth certificate. The disorder itself can be diagnosed as early as infancy, but this is very rare.

This shows that children under the age of four are not exempt from ADHD. An important thing to remember is that although children with ADHD may behave differently than other children, they often tend to grow out of it. It is not common to diagnose children under the age of four with ADHD, however it is adequately possible.

preschoolers with adhd

Add in 5 year old.

Methylphenidate (MPH) is the stimulant used to treat ADHD in children, adolescents and adults. Amphetamines are stimulants too.

ADHD in toddlers are much more likely to have sleep issues than children without ADHD. The usual hours of sleep for these children is at least 1 hour less than the average child of the same age.

Ritalin and Adderall are stimulants that can be used to treat ADHD.

How do I know if a 5 year old has ADHD?

– 5 year old children with ADHD might have trouble paying attention, act impulsively and struggle to control their behavior.

– If your 5 year old child is acting like this, they might have ADHD and it’s important that you take them to a doctor for a diagnosis and treatment.

– You can have a preliminary diagnosis of ADHD if your child shows signs such as: losing toys, skin picking, biting people, reckless behavior and anger issues.

Can you test a 2 year old for ADHD?

Yes. If the hyperactivity, impulsivity and inattention symptoms are significantly affecting a toddler’s daily functions, a doctor can diagnose ADHD. A parent should make sure to describe each of the child’s symptoms very specifically to their pediatrician or primary care provider. The medical term for diagnosing ADHD is “making a diagnosis of ADHD.”

How do they test toddlers for ADHD?

There are different methods for diagnosing ADHD in toddlers, but the most common ways to test a toddler as young as 2 years old for ADHD is by using standardised questionnaires and computer-based tasks. This doesn’t mean that you’ll be asked questions about your child’s behaviour every time they have an appointment with their pediatrician or at school, but that specific questionnaires are used at different times to assess for ADHD.

The Conner’s Scale is a questionnaire filled out by parents, which questions your child’s behaviour based on the last four weeks of their lives. It separates ADHD symptoms into three dimensions: global measure, hyperactivity/impulsivity and inattention. The daily activity rating scale is another questionnaire that assesses how your child’s life is going for the last seven days.

Global measure.

Items in this section consist of questions like: “How often is your child irritable or resentful?”, “Does your child argue with you or others?”, “How often does your child demonstrate thoughtless or disrespectful behaviour?” and “Is your child selfish or spiteful?”.

hyperactivity/impulsivity.

Items from this section consist of questions like: “How often has your child been talking excessively?”, “Does your child frequently interrupt conversations?” and “Is it hard for you to get your child to sit still for meals or when doing quiet activities?”.

Inattention.

Items from this section consist of questions like: “How often does your child have a hard time sustaining attention during play or tasks?”, “Does your child make careless mistakes when working on a task?”, and “Is it difficult for you to keep your child’s attention when you are talking to him/her?”.

The parents answer questions on a four-point scale from ‘never’ to ‘very often’, and the answers are summed up to give a score from 0-30 for each dimension. Any score above 12 is considered as a symptom of ADHD, however 8 or above indicates ‘the need for follow-up’.

In the daily activity rating scale, parents answer questions about how their child has been behaving in the past week in regards to: restlessness and fidgeting, social interaction and withdrawal, inattention and impulsivity. These questions are asked on a four-point scale from ‘not at all’ to ‘very much so’, and the answers are summed up again to give a score from 0-30 for each dimension. Scores above 11 in both scales indicate ‘the need for follow-up’.

Another method for testing toddlers with ADHD is by using computer-based tasks. For this, children are seated in front of a computer with two buttons, one for ‘yes’ and another for ‘no’, and pictures are presented on the screen. However, some pictures are replaced by symbols that are common in ADHD, such as the letter ‘X’ or a jeep. If your child sees these symbols instead of an image, they have to hit the ‘no’ button to keep the game going, but if they see an image they have to hit the ‘yes’ button.

This means that children with ADHD have a harder time focusing on images instead of symbols, because their brain has problems inhibiting other stimuli in their surroundings. After following instructions for about 10 minutes, children are asked to hit the ‘yes’ or ‘no’ button depending on what is presented to them. If your child is old enough, they will have to explain their reasoning for either answer.

This method of testing has shown that children with ADHD show less brain activity in inhibition areas like the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), which suggests they are struggling to keep their minds from being distracted by other things.

Conclusion: ADHD in toddlers is becoming an increasingly common diagnosis. This article should have answered most of your questions about what it means to be diagnosed with this disorder and how you can help your child get the best treatment possible. If you still need more information, contact our doctors for help!

Alzheimer’s disease | Symptoms, Diagnosis and related conditions

Alzheimer’s disease is a type of dementia that worsens over time. It can be debilitating for both the person with Alzheimer’s and the family members who care for them. The symptoms are different depending on where in the brain Alzheimer’s has attacked, but most commonly include memory loss, confusion, mood swings, difficulty speaking or swallowing, and personality changes. Other conditions related to Alzheimer’s are Parkinson’s Disease (PD), Lewy Body Dementia (LBD) and vascular dementia.

 Symptoms and Diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease

Symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease begin with subtle memory loss and personality changes that are different from typical age-related memory loss. As Alzheimer’s disease progresses, symptoms become more severe.

Symptoms are typically not present in the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease because it usually takes several years for brain changes to develop enough to cause symptoms. Most people with Alzheimer’s dementia do not live past eight years after diagnosis, but some may survive up to 20 years 

As the disease advances, memory loss grows and decision-making abilities deteriorate. Alzheimer’s disease can also cause changes in judgment, behavior, and the ability to communicate.

Symptoms of Alzheimer’s Disease include:

– Difficulty remembering newly learned information

– Repeating themselves or having trouble finding words, particularly when speaking 

– Having problems organizing daily tasks and activities such as taking medications , paying bills, cooking meals, doing laundry and getting dressed in the morning

– Withdrawing from work or social situations that were once enjoyed

– Losing interest in hobbies or other activities once found pleasurable 

– Trouble completing the tasks of everyday life, such as brushing teeth and bathing 

– Misplacing items around the house or losing track of things like keys or cell phones

 Experiencing mood changes including feeling anxious, irritable , frustrated, sad, or depressed

 – Seeing things that are not there (hallucinations)

Diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease is based on medical history , memory testing, personality changes, and other factors. Doctors also may order brain imaging studies such as CT scans, MRI scans , or PET scans to look for physical signs associated with Alzheimer’s disease.

 Treatments of Alzheimer’s disease

There are medicines and supportive therapies that can aid with memory and behavior issues, in addition to the fact that Alzheimer’s disease is not irreversible. However, the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease is more focused on controlling symptoms than preventing or slowing down its progression. There is currently no cure for Alzheimer’s disease.

There are several pharmaceutical treatments available on the market today to help with some of the symptoms of Alzheimer’s, such as anxiety and depression. In addition, people who have been diagnosed can undergo therapies that will keep their brains active in order to slow down or prevent memory loss from occurring. For instance, physical exercise is known to be beneficial for the brain so people can engage in activities like swimming, walking or jogging during their leisure time.

Brain disorders are some of the most common neurological conditions worldwide and Alzheimer’s disease ranks second among all types of dementia after Age-related dementia. Some factors that contribute to this condition include genetic predisposition, aging and environmental factors.

Although the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease is more focused on controlling symptoms than preventing or slowing down its progression, there are several pharmaceutical treatments available to help with some of the most common symptoms such as anxiety and depression. In addition, people who have been diagnosed can undergo therapies that will keep their brains active in order to slow down memory loss. Physical exercise is known to be beneficial for the brain so people can engage in activities like swimming, walking or jogging during their leisure time.

 Related conditions

Dementia is not always caused by Alzheimer’s. Neurocognitive disorders are a class of neurologic diseases that includes Alzheimer’s. Other types of dementia include Vascular Dementia, frontotemporal lobar degeneration and Lewy body disease.

Dementia is a general term for memory loss that worsens over time. it is one type of dementia. It causes problems with memory, thinking and behavior. Symptoms usually develop slowly over several years before reaching a noticeable stage.

All of these conditions are chronic diseases that require lifelong care and attention, but the treatment for each is typically different. It  has no cure or specific medication to prevent further memory loss; however, treatments like medications, therapy sessions and special activities can help improve symptoms like anxiety-related behaviors in patients with this condition.

Conclusion : Alzheimer’s is a horrible disease that can be debilitating for both the person with Alzheimer’s and the family members who care for them. It affects people in different ways, but most commonly includes memory loss, confusion, mood swings, difficulty speaking or swallowing, personality changes and other conditions related to it like Parkinson’s Disease (PD), Lewy Body Dementia (LBD) and vascular dementia.

If you are struggling with opioid use disorder because of your addiction to prescription drugs- contact our doctors now before things get worse!

Air pollution and mental health

Air pollution and mental health

Mental health is a very important aspect in most people’s lives. People who suffer from mental illnesses are more likely to have air quality problems, air pollution has many negative effects on the body, air pollution can also cause issues with mental health.

Air pollution can lead to chronic problems that will only get worse over time.

Many people don’t know, but air pollution has a major impact on mental health.

Air pollution has been linked to many mental disorders including anxiety and depression.

How air pollution affect mental health

Air pollution can cause serious mental health problems in people who are exposed to air pollution regularly. Studies show that exposure to pollutants like nitrogen dioxide (NO2), benzene, ozone, and sulfur dioxide (SO2) can lead to mental health problems.

Air pollution has been linked to the development of major depression and anxiety disorders in people who live in highly polluted areas. The risk of having a psychiatric disorder was greater in people with chronic exposure to air pollutants than those who live in urban areas with lower levels of air pollution.

Symptoms

In addition to developing mental illnesses, those who have been exposed to high levels of air pollution can also experience a number of different symptoms.

Symptoms include:

-Dry mouth

-Lingering respiratory infections

-Coughs and colds that do not go away as quickly as they should

-Rash

 

-Fatigue

-Headache or facial pressure

-Changes in appetite, weight gain, and sleep disturbance.

How does air pollution affect depression?

Studies show that exposure to pollution can be linked to the development of depression. Exposure to air pollutants increases the risk of developing major depression by 33 percent, and anxiety disorder increased by 30 percent.

The longer people are exposed to air pollution the higher their chances are of developing mental illness problems later down the line. People who live in areas with high levels of air pollution are also more likely to develop depression, anxiety, and other mental disorders than people who live in areas with lower concentrations of pollutants.

People who breathe high levels of air pollution are at higher risk for developing psychiatric problems. Pollutants can cause inflammation in the respiratory system which releases cytokines into the bloodstream that can affect mood. People who have chronic respiratory diseases are more likely to suffer from depression.

Air pollution also triggers the release of inflammatory cytokines in the bloodstream, causing inflammation in the respiratory system which can lead to lung infections.

People with asthma are especially at risk for developing mental health problems when exposed to high levels of air pollutants.

What are the causes of mental pollution?

Exposure to air pollutants is a major cause of mental health problems, but other factors such as pre-existing medical conditions and genetics may also contribute to the development of mental illness after exposure to pollutants.

Other factors that can influence how pollution affects the brain are:

-Pre-existing medical conditions

-Genetic factors

-Smoking is also a major contributor. If you smoke, quitting will reduce the risk of having mental health problems caused by air pollution.

Bottom line: Air pollution can lead to chronic health problems, and when combined with other factors such as genetics and pre-existing conditions, it can increase the risk that someone will develop mental illness. People who live in areas with high concentrations of air pollutants are especially at risk.

How does pollution affect emotional development?

A recent study shows that infants and young children who live in areas with high levels of air pollution are more likely to develop emotional and behavioral problems.

The study followed 2,734 children from birth to 7 years old in the Netherlands.

It was found that babies who were exposed to air pollutants during pregnancy had an increased risk of developing behavioral problems at age 3 and emotional problems at age 7.

Babies exposed to air pollution during the first year of life were more likely to have a lower IQ score and a higher risk for hyperactivity at 7 years old compared to those who lived in areas with low levels of air pollution.

What dirty air does to your brain.

Air pollution is made up of a mixture of gases, liquids, and suspended particles that have been linked to a number of respiratory health problems. Exposure to air pollutants can lead to inflammation in the brain as well as lung function problems.

When you breathe polluted air, your lungs absorb pollutants which trigger an inflammatory response from the brain’s glial cells.

The release of cytokines during this process can lead to problems in thinking, memory, and learning.

exposure to air pollution has also been linked to cognitive decline and neurodegenerative diseases that affect the brain later in life.

Ozone (O3) is one type of air pollutant that has been associated with deteriorating mental health.

Researchers found that exposure to high levels of ozone increased the risk for psychotic symptoms and cognitive decline in older women.

Can pollution lower IQ?

A number of studies show that living in areas with high levels of air pollution can be linked to lower IQ scores.

Researchers looked at 645 children in Mexico City who were born in the 1990s.

Air pollution and mental health

The study found that children with prenatal exposure to high levels of air pollutants, including ozone, nitrogen dioxide, and carbon monoxide, had lower IQ scores at age 7 compared to children who were not exposed to air pollutants in the womb.

People who live in polluted areas also suffer from cognitive decline, including symptoms of dementia.

Bottom line: Living in areas with high levels of air pollution can lead to mental health problems and lower IQ scores. People who live in polluted areas suffer from cognitive decline that may be linked to symptoms of dementia.

Conclusion: Air pollution has been linked to many mental disorders including anxiety and depression. The more you know about the effects of air quality, the better prepared you’ll be in fighting it’s negative impacts on your health.

If you think that this is an issue for yourself or someone close to you, contact our doctors today for help!

Alzheimer’s disease physical exercise

Alzheimer’s disease physical exercise

It is well-known that physical exercise can help prevent dementia in healthy people. But what about those with Alzheimer’s disease? Is there an effect of exercise on Alzheimer’s patients? The answer is yes, and it has been shown in a study. In this blog post we will discuss the benefits of exercising for Alzheimer’s sufferers, as well as how to get started.

According to research, those who exercise frequently have a decreased risk of mental decline and are less likely to get Alzheimer’s disease. Physical activity is one of the modifiable risk factors for dementia.

What exercise is good for Alzheimer’s?

Exercise that is aerobic and resistance training are good for the brain. Aerobic exercise strengthens your heart, which in turn supplies more oxygen to the brain. Strength training (resistance) trains muscles against an opposing force like weights or medicine balls – this activates neurons in both hemispheres of the cortex increasing their ability to communicate with each other.

There is little argument that regular exercise benefits health. The question for Alzheimer’s sufferers is: which type of exercise should I do?

Study shows that aerobic and resistance training can help prevent dementia in healthy people. A study conducted by the University of British Columbia (UBC) found that older adults with mild cognitive impairment had improved memory after participating in a 12-week program consisting of three types of exercise: aerobic, strength and flexibility.

All forms of exercise have their benefits but the study did not identify one type as being better than another. Both resistance training (weight lifting) and aerobics were found to improve cognitive function in people with mild dementia issues.

Aerobic activities:

– cycling (stationary or outdoors)

– dancing, pilates and water aerobics

– hiking/walking/running in forested areas – gardening

Resistance exercises: weight lifting for muscular strength can be done at home with dumbbells. Resistance bands are also useful to increase the intensity of your workouts without putting too much strain on the joints.

Flexibility training: stretching exercises for flexibility should be done at least three times a week to maintain joint mobility and help prevent falls from stiffness. This type of exercise is also known as balance or functional training, which can be helpful in preventing accidents due to loss of coordination.

How often?

The study recommends exercising at least three times a week for 30 minutes per session. If you have time, try to do five days of exercise and two rest days during the week. Remember that consistency is key so find an activity you enjoy doing and stick with it!

 Why is exercise good for Alzheimer’s?

Exercise increases the amount of oxygen and nutrients that enter the brain, which can potentially make it stronger and more able to fight against dementia. Exercise also has been shown to reduce anxiety and depression in people with depression or Alzheimer’s. It may help them feel more active and engaged with other people throughout their day.

 In addition, exercise also has been shown to reduce anxiety and depression in people with depression or Alzheimer’s. It may help them feel more active and engaged with other people throughout their day.

Just 20 minutes of sustained aerobic activity every day may reduce the risk of dementia by 60%! Plus, exercise is also known to help with depression prevention.

Scientists are still trying to figure out why there appears to be a connection between physical activity and brain health. But if you want your brain to stay sharp—no matter what your age—the best thing you can do is get moving. Every day, find ways to sneak exercise into your life: Take the stairs instead of an elevator or escalator, park farther from supermarket entrances or take a walk during lunch hour! Exercise has been shown in numerous studies worldwide that it helps not just with preventing Alzheimer’s disease but stopping its progression too!

 Does walking help Alzheimer’s?

Yes, in one study people with mild cognitive impairment who walked three times a week for 40 minutes had 28% less mental decline than those who didn’t. Walking can strengthen your body and mind. It stimulates blood flow to the brain and muscles while reducing blood pressure and stress hormones such as cortisol, which is tied to Alzheimer’s risk.

 How exercise cleans the brain of Alzheimer’s?

The exercise can remove amyloid completely from the brain. The study shows that exercise prevents dementia and physical activity cleans up brain beta-amyloid, a type of plaque associated with Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia.

 How exercise cleans the brain of Alzheimer's
Elderly woman doing active pnf exercises with a teal scarf as a part of her rehabilitation program with a physiatrist

 Can exercise reverse Alzheimer’s? And how long an early exercise should last.

This is difficult to say, because Alzheimer diagnosis can’t be made until you have been symptomatic for at least 12 months. In addition, the disease’s progression varies from person to person and research into it is still in its infancy.

Although one variety of dementia that seems responsive to exercise is frontotemporal dementia–a disease whose onset tends to be much earlier than Alzheimer’s and which may have a genetic component.

But there are many other types of dementia, so the bottom line is: if you think something might be going wrong with your brain functions or memory skills, see your physician right away. If he or she is concerned about early dementia (anything before age 65), they will refer you for an initial barrage of tests

Why do Alzheimer patients walk so much?

Research suggests that for some patients, simple behaviors are an outlet of lowered frustration which may indicate pathways for therapeutic intervention.

The Walking programs also emphasize the maintenance of independence and social stimulation. With these combined, it provides a healthcare team with relative ease in providing care to this patient population through basic nursing procedures with limited specialized expertise.

More on Alzheimer’s Disease And Exercise

There is evidence that mild therapeutic exercise has prevented dementia in some people at risk for developing this disorder (i.e., clinical trials). It’s not yet shown whether exercise can improve cognitive or functional outcomes among people with impaired brain function due to Alzheimer-type dementias; more research is needed to identify if there might be an effective role for periodic gentle exercise (e.g., yoga, tai chi) or even brain training (i.e., computerized cognitive exercises).

Exercise for Dementia Prevention

The National Institute on Aging suggests that physical activity can help to reduce the risk of dementia in older adults and provides some tips here: Physical Activity Tips For Older Adults .

Conclusion: There are many benefits of physical exercise, and Alzheimer’s patients can reap the rewards too. Studies have shown that regular aerobic activity helps to reduce cognitive decline in sufferers of dementia.

If you would like more information or help getting started with a program for your loved one, please contact us today!

Clinical depression

Clinical depression

depression is a mental illness that causes people to experience deep, unshakable sadness and diminished interest in nearly every aspect of their lives. Clinical depression can affect anyone, regardless of age or background.

Someone who is clinically depressed might experience a variety of symptoms, such as endless feelings of hopelessness, irritability or anxiety, loss of interest in activities they once enjoyed, changes in appetite or sleeping patterns, difficulty concentrating and making decisions, feeling guilty or worthless, withdrawing from other people, and even thoughts of suicide.

Clinical depression can result from a combination of factors, including biological and environmental influences, as well as stressful life events. There is no single reason why someone might develop clinical depression.

Once sets in, a person might find it difficult to function normally and fulfil their usual roles at home, work, or school. Left untreated, c can last for months or even years.

How can a person tell if they are clinically depressed?

There are several warning signs that might indicate if someone is suffering from clinical depression. These include ongoing feelings of sadness, anxiety, irritability, fatigue, changes in sleep patterns, and the loss of interest in activities that were once pleasurable.

A person might also experience a variety of physical symptoms, such as chest pain or a persistent loss of energy. If these symptoms persist for more than a few days, it might indicates.

What are the most common causes of clinical depression?

People who suffer from depression might have a family history of the illness or they might have experienced stressful, traumatic events in their lives.

People who experience might also find it more difficult to cope with certain situations and changes, such as:

– the loss of a loved one

– a life-threatening illness or chronic pain

– the end of a relationship

– financial difficulties, unemployment, or poverty

– a major or unexpected change, such as moving to a new city or country

– social isolation and loneliness

Symptoms

How can a person tell if they are clinically depressed

Requires a medical diagnosis or confirmation from a professional.

The symptoms associated with clinical depression are different for each person, but they are often severe enough that they interfere with the sufferer’s day-to-day life.

Someone who is clinically depressed might experience a variety of symptoms, such as endless feelings of hopelessness, irritability or anxiety, loss of interest in activities they once enjoyed, changes in appetite or sleeping patterns, difficulty concentrating and making decisions, feeling guilty or worthless, withdrawing from other people, and even thoughts of suicide.

Treatments of clinical depression.

The most common treatments are psychological therapies, such as cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and interpersonal therapy (IPT).  These treatments, which focus on changing a person’s negative thought patterns and behaviours, can help alleviate the symptoms of clinical depression.

Psychological therapies combined with antidepressants might also help improve a person’s symptoms. However, some drugs present more serious risks than others and should only be taken under the supervision of a medical professional.

Treating clinical depression with Therapy:

Research has shown that psychological therapy can be an effective treatment for many people with clinical depression.  Psychological therapies focus on changing a person’s negative thought patterns and behaviors which can alleviate symptoms of clinical depression.

Treating clinical depression with Medication:

Antidepressants are medications that aim to change the levels of certain chemicals in the brain that are thought to contribute to clinical depression.  However, some drugs can present more serious risks than others and should only be taken under the supervision of a medical professional.

Conclusion: If you’re experiencing any of the symptoms we talked about today, please call our doctors for help. We can provide a diagnosis and treatment options that will lead to your recovery from depression. It is possible to get out of this dark place, but it takes time and commitment on your part.

Let us know if there are other questions or comments you have by contacting us. Thank you for reading!

Depression with its symptoms and treatments

Depression with its symptoms and treatments

Depression is a serious medical condition. It can be difficult to identify the signs of depression and even more challenging to find treatment that works for you or someone you care about.

Depression is not something that goes away on its own – it needs time and attention from those around them, as well as themselves. This blog post will walk you through some common symptoms of depression and how it may be best treated with the help of a doctor, therapist, or by using natural remedies such as supplements or exercise.

Symptoms of depression

Depression can range from moderate to severe, and it has the following signs:

– Excessive sadness that doesn’t go away

– Loss of interest in activities you used to enjoy or feeling unable to appreciate them anymore

– Feeling worthless, guilty, and/or helpless almost every day

– Irritability and restlessness instead of feelings of calmness  and peacefulness most days

– Having trouble with sleep – either too much or not being able to sleep at all

– Struggling with changes in appetite, either eating more or less than usual  or having an inability to eat anything at all

– Having trouble concentrating and thinking clearly

– Feeling tired, sluggish, and lethargic almost every day. Not wanting to get out of bed most days

– Feeling as if your life isn’t as meaningful and purposeful as it once was.  Having thoughts of death often or suicide attempts

If you notice that someone is showing these symptoms, then they may be clinically depressed. You should talk to them about seeking treatment or even just scheduling a doctor’s visit for yourself and bring up the symptoms.

Depression treatments

Risk factors of depression

There are many factors that contribute to depression in people. Doctors who specialize in psychiatry will ask about the following when diagnosing someone with depression:

– Personal or family history of mental health disorders, especially bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder

– History of physical or sexual abuse during childhood  or adulthood – this does not mean everyone is depressed due to their past, but if there is a history of abuse it can contribute to depression

– History with addiction – most people who have been addicted to drugs or alcohol are depressed because they lost touch with social groups and fell into isolation. This does not mean everyone with addiction has depression though.

Treatments for depression

Treatment for depression is different depending on the individual. Typically, doctors will recommend psychotherapy first to see if an individual can learn how to cope with their feelings of sadness or lack of interest in activities they once enjoyed. If this does not work well enough, then antidepressants are often prescribed alongside therapy sessions. However, there are other treatments that may work better for some people, such as:

– Cognitive therapy to help individuals identify and change their negative thoughts or beliefs that contribute to depression.  This helps them become more rational in how they think and adjust accordingly.

– Physical activity like exercise can be helpful because it stimulates endorphins, which are chemicals naturally produced by the brain that make someone feel happy and confident. It also helps to release stress, which can be a major contributor to depression

– Acupuncture is helpful for some individuals by relieving muscle tension or pain throughout the body that may contribute to feelings of sadness.  It has been found effective in many studies as an alternative treatment for depression .

Depression isn’t something that can just be “snapped out of.” It’s a serious disorder that requires help. If you think someone is depressed, then tell them to seek professional treatment or talk with their doctor about how they’re feeling and what may be contributing to it.

People with depression might feel very alone and like nobody understands them, but there are many other people who have been diagnosed or even suspected of having clinical depression. It doesn’t make you weak to get help from a professional – it takes courage since the stigma surrounding mental illness is still so high in our culture today! Many people just need a few sessions with a therapist to get the treatment they need and go on to live happy, fulfilling lives.

Your loved ones may worry about you when you’re depressed if they see your symptoms manifesting themselves in different ways such as social isolation or changes in behavior. It might be hard for them to know what’s wrong if it isn’t something that’s been going on for a long time. If you have depression, then your loved ones can help you by being supportive and encouraging to talk to a doctor, therapist or counselor about how they feel.

It’s important that those with clinical depression seek treatment as soon as possible because of the risk of self harm or suicide if it continues too long without being treated.

If you have depression, then it may be best to try working with a doctor or therapist so that they can recommend things like natural remedies or supplements for your condition along with other treatment options.  Some people find success in doing yoga, tai chi, jogging, cooking healthy meals at home and meditating regularly which all have shown to help with depression.

Working on getting treatment and support from loved ones is the best way that you can get back to feeling like yourself again! Depression is a serious condition, but it’s something that many people live well with when they seek out the right resources and support networks. It may take some time for you or someone close to you to feel better, but it’s always worth the hard work!

Self help and coping skills

Doctors will recommend psychotherapy first to see if an individual can learn how to cope with their feelings of sadness or lack of interest in activities they once enjoyed. If this does not work well enough, then antidepressants are often prescribed alongside therapy sessions. However, there are other treatments that may work better for some people, such as:

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

This type of therapy helps people with depression to identify their negative thoughts and beliefs that contribute to the disorder so they can change them.  It is a short term treatment (usually around 12 sessions) and works well for many individuals, but not all. Some therapists use mindfulness techniques in this form of treatment as well by having patients practice breathing exercises and meditation in order to cope with their symptoms.

Alternative Therapies

Some people find success when they use alternative therapies such as acupuncture , yoga, tai chi or jogging for depression . These have been shown to help alleviate physical pain that can contribute to mental illness along with other methods like keeping a journal about how you’re feeling, exercising regularly and cooking at home.  However, if these do not work or are too difficult to incorporate into your life on a regular basis, then it is time to talk with your doctor about trying something new.

Hobbies

You may be surprised that some people find joy when they try out a new hobby by learning something new or getting creative. You can also help yourself feel better by focusing on the present moment without judging it – this is known as mindfulness . This will make you less likely to dwell on your thoughts and feelings of depression which could lead to depressive episodes in the future.

If you are not sure where to start when looking for natural remedies, supplements or alternative therapies for depression, then it may be best to speak with your doctor or therapist first.  However, they will not always know exactly what is the right treatment plan for you – so if this method does not work well enough after trying it two times consecutively, then ask about options that are available to you.

It’s important that those with clinical depression seek treatment as soon as possible because of the risk of self harm or suicide if it continues too long without being treated.  Doctors, therapists and counselors will recommend psychotherapy first before prescribing any medications to see if an individual can learn how to cope with their feelings of sadness or lack of interest in activities they once enjoyed.

 Conclusion: Depression can be difficult to identify and it takes time, patience, and attention from those around them as well as themselves. This blog post will walk you through some common symptoms of depression and how it may be best treated with the help of a doctor or therapist.

If you are struggling with any signs of depression or want more information on natural remedies to combat this serious medical condition please contact our doctors today for assistance!

Diet Alzheimer’s

Diet Alzheimer’s

Alzheimer’s is a neurological disease that can cause memory loss, confusion and problems with language. Diet plays an important part in prevention, management and cure of Alzheimer’s. Diet for dementia is also important to maintain a healthy lifestyle. Diet-related changes may help reduce the risk of developing Alzheimer’s or delay its progression.

In this blog post we will go into detail about diet Alzheimers, what it is and how it affects people suffering from it as well as suggestions on how to improve your diet to prevent you from getting the illness in the first place!

The diet for dementia is also important to maintain a healthy lifestyle. Diet-related changes may help reduce the risk of developing Alzheimer’s or delay its progression.

Alzheimer’s prevention foods

Alzheimer’s prevention foods include walnuts, green leafy vegetables, blueberries and other antioxidant-rich foods.

Walnuts are high in omega-three fatty acids which can help to prevent Alzheimer’s disease. Green leafy vegetables contain vitamin E that helps protect the cells from free radical damage. Blueberries improve memory and cognition by reducing inflammation in the brain.

Alzheimer’s disease is the most common type of dementia. It can cause memory loss, confusion and problems with language. But it doesn’t affect everyone the same way – some people experience more severe symptoms than others or no symptoms at all!

A new study has shown that walnuts are high in omega-three fatty acids which have anti-inflammatory properties and can help to prevent Alzheimer’s disease. Green leafy vegetables contain vitamin E that helps protect the cells from free radical damage which is known to contribute towards neurodegenerative diseases like dementia.

Adopt a Healthy Diet

Blueberries improve memory and cognition by reducing inflammation in the brain, another condition linked with cognitive decline and Alzheimer’s disease.

Alzheimer nutrition refers to the health and diet of a person suffering from Alzheimer’s disease. It is very important that their nutrition intake doesn’t cause malnutrition as this can worsen the symptoms and progression of dementia.

There are different types of dementia but they all share some common features, such as gradually worsening memory loss which affects daily life. The most common form is Alzheimer’s disease, which is the leading cause of dementia.

Diet for dementia

A proper balanced diet is important for people suffering from dementia. They are more sensitive to taste, smell and texture of food due to their condition so it’s best that they stick with soft foods. A good Alzheimer nutrition plan should include meat, fish or poultry at least twice a day as well as plenty of fruits and vegetables every day.

It is very important that their nutrition intake doesn’t cause malnutrition as this can worsen the symptoms and progression of dementia. A good Alzheimer diet plan should include meat, fish or poultry at least twice a day as well as plenty of fruits and vegetables every day to boost immunity and energy levels!

Alzheimer’s diet cure

There is no cure for Alzheimer’s disease but a healthy diet can help ease the symptoms and improve quality of life.

A person suffering from dementia needs to follow a proper balanced diet which should consist of low fat food, lots of fruits and vegetables as well as lean protein sources such as fish or chicken every day.

It may not be a cure but the right type of diet can certainly help to ease symptoms and improve people’s quality of life.

Alzheimer nutrition

Alzheimer nutrition refers to the health and diet of a person suffering from Alzheimer’s disease.

It is very important that their new intake doesn’t cause malnutrition, especially because people with Alzheimer’s are more sensitive to taste, smell and texture of food.

A person suffering from dementia needs to follow a proper balanced diet which should consist of low fat food, lots of fruits and vegetables as well as lean protein sources such as fish or chicken every day.

Dementia prevention diet

Researchers at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago have published a study demonstrating the MIND diet, which they devised. Their study showed that the MIND diet reduces dementia and cognitive decline by as much as 53 percent. A separate follow-up survey of nearly 300 participants found those who closely adhered to the MIND recommendations over a period of twelve years had significantly less memory loss than others, even when factors such as age, education level, exercise habits were taken into account.

A separate follow-up survey found that those who closely adhered to the MIND recommendations over a period of twelve years had significantly less memory loss than others.

Diet and Alzheimer’s

There has been a lot of research into how dietary patterns affect the risk of Alzheimer’s disease. It appears that the foods you eat can help protect your memory or increase your risk for this devastating disease.

Research shows people who follow a Mediterranean-style diet are less likely to develop Alzheimer’s than those who do not regularly eat healthful plant-based meals, including fruits and vegetables (ideally fresh), whole grains, beans/legumes, seeds, and nuts.

The same benefits are true for cardiovascular health as it reduces the risk by at least 25 percent. This is likely due to its positive effects on blood flow to the brain, which can be compromised in people with Alzheimer’s disease or dementia.

Best foods for Alzheimer’s prevention

Other dementia-fighting foods that are helpful include fish high in omega-three fatty acids, coffee (even decaf), tea, dark chocolate and wine.

Alzheimer’s disease diet

An Alzheimer’s diet is a very important part of treatment for patients with dementia or Alzheimer’s disease to enable them to maintain their quality of life. This dementia diet is designed to provide the best possible nutrition without any health risks for dementia patients who are at risk of malnutrition, dehydration or weight loss due to their condition and current medication treatments.

Anti dementia diet

The dementia diet is a very important part of treatment for patients with dementia or Alzheimer’s disease to enable them to maintain their quality of life. The dementia diet is designed to provide the best possible nutrition without any health risks for dementia patients who are at risk of malnutrition, dehydration or weight loss due to their condition and current medication treatments.

Some foods that can fight dementia and alzheimer’s disease include:

– Whole grains

– Legumes

– Fish high in omega-3 fatty acids

– Coffee (even decaf)

– Tea

– Dark chocolate

– Wine.

If you are looking for the best possible diet plan to help prevent or manage Alzheimer’s disease, it is important that your nutrition be balanced and complete. The MIND diet should also be considered because research shows this type of eating pattern can reduce dementia by as much as 53%. Dieting alone won’t stop or reverse memory loss; however, following a healthy plant-based Mediterranean style diet will go a long way in helping keep cognitive function sharp well into old age.

Please be sure to contact our doctors today for more help!

Dissociative disorders with it’s symptoms and treatments

Dissociative disorders are one of the most secretive and least understood forms of mental illness. Dissociative disorders are an umbrella term, describing a wide range of conditions in which elements of identity (personal history, name, gender) or sensory awareness (hearing, vision) become separated from the person’s normal sense of self. Dissociation is thought to be one of the main causes of conditions such as Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID) and Dissociative Trance Disorder.

Symptoms of Dissociative disorders

Dissociative symptoms can be tough to spot, as they’re often as vague as symptoms of better-known conditions such as anxiety and depression. Dissociative symptoms include:

– Feeling disconnected from the world around you or your own body

– Having a hard time remembering things that actually happened or familiar things. Dissociation only causes memory problems when it’s severe.

– Having sudden and unexplained changes in your mood or personality, such as going from outgoing to withdrawn in a short amount of time.

– Feeling like you’re observing yourself from outside your body or that things around you aren’t real.

– Finding it hard to focus, concentrate, pay attention and make decisions. This is also associated with problems sleeping.

Types of dissociative disorder

Dissociative identity disorder (DID): This is the only dissociative disorder recognized by mental health professionals. DID involves having at least two distinct personalities or identities, each with its own pattern of perceiving, relating to and thinking about the environment and self.

– Dissociative amnesia: This involves losing memory for personal information, usually of a traumatic or stressful nature. This is very common in cases of childhood sexual abuse, where the child becomes “stuck” at the age they were when first subjected to sexual abuse.

– Depersonalization disorder:  This involves feeling like you’re observing yourself from outside your body, “on autopilot” or in a dream.

– Derealization disorder: This is feeling detached from your surroundings, such as everything around you seems fake or colorless.

– Dissociative fugue: This is the sudden, unexpected and purposeful travel away from home or work, with an inability to recall some of your past.

– Dissociative motor disorders: This involves a loss of voluntary movement and feeling stuck in a particular position, such as sitting down.

– Dissociative trance disorder:  This is characterized by a temporary narrowing or complete loss of awareness of your surroundings, which can take place in everyday events such as driving.

symptoms of Dissociative disorders in children

The first signs of dissociative disorders in children are often school absences, poor grades or disruptive behavior. Other indicators include:

– Refusing to go to school

– Shying away from friends and family members

– Physical complaints such as headaches, stomachaches and fatigue. These can also lead to frequent visits to the nurse’s office

– A sudden personality change, such as becoming more withdrawn or constantly irritable. These children tend to become sad and moody

– Low self-esteem and feelings of shame and guilt

– Sleep problems and nightmares

– Not wanting to talk about a traumatic event that happened in the past; for example, abuse or neglect

– Unexplained medical problems, particularly those related to their respiratory, gastrointestinal or nervous systems.

– Acting as if they have a disability or unexplained bodily sensations

– Saying things like “I’m bad” or “I’m evil”

– Difficulty concentrating and learning in school

Risk factors of dissociative disorders

Though a dissociative disorder can develop at any age, most start during the teenage years. It’s more likely to occur in people who’ve experienced physical or sexual abuse early in life, though it often occurs without a history of trauma. People with mental illnesses such as depression and anxiety also have an increased risk of developing a dissociative disorder.

– History of abuse and neglect as a child

– Sexual or physical abuse, emotional neglect or other traumatic event in childhood

– Significant stress during childhood, such as the death of a parent or other loved one, divorce or moving away from home

– Witnessing or experiencing intense violence as an adult

Individuals who have been subjected to physical or sexual abuse as children are frequently victims of dissociative identity disorder.

Suicide attempts are common with individuals having DID and is more than 20 times the rate of that in the general population.

Though rarely diagnosed in children, dissociative disorders can result due to exposure to traumatic events such as:

– Life-threatening injury in a child – Learning about a serious illness or death of someone close in a child

– Witnessing physical and sexual abuse in a child

– Witnessing domestic violence between one of their parents and another adult

– Regularly being subjected to criticism, blame, excessive demands or hostility without cause in a child

– Having parents involved in substance abuse or with mental health problems

An estimated two thirds of children who have been diagnosed with dissociative disorders will be victims of maltreatment.

Dissociative disorders Treatments

Many patients are successful in addressing the major symptoms of DID and improving their capacity to function with appropriate therapy. Generally the treatment involves psychotherapy. When dissociation is severe and longstanding, success with traditional psychoanalysis may be limited. While supporting the patient in linking traumatic events with current pain and problems, hypnosis, or a similar technique called guided imagery, is often used to access and then allow expression of the dissociated identities and their functions.

Risk factors of dissociative disorders

– Medications

– Dissociative disorders are often treated with a combination of psychotherapy and medication. Antidepressants, anti-anxiety medications and antipsychotics may help reduce some of the dissociative symptoms such as mood swings, stress and anxiety.

– Hypnosis

An alternative technique called hypnosis is sometimes used to give patients direct and immediate access to memories of trauma.

– Psychotherapy

– Dissociative disorders are typically treated with a type of therapy known as “psychodynamic psychotherapy.” In this form of treatment, the patient discusses early life experiences and relationships with the goal of understanding how they contribute to current problems. The therapist uses techniques such as hypnosis and age regression to help the patient recall forgotten memories of trauma, so they can be processed with less anxiety.

– Group therapy

– A type of psychotherapy called group therapy has been found to help some people who suffer from dissociative disorders. In this form of treatment, patients meet in a group and discuss their thoughts and feelings about their disorder and how it impacts them. This helps people learn from others as well as to better understand their illness.

– Other treatment options

– In rare cases, a psychiatrist may recommend electroconvulsive treatment (ECT). ECT can be effective for those who have severe depression, mood swings or anxiety that has not been helped by other treatments.

– Treatment resistance

When dissociative identity disorder does not respond to treatment, it is sometimes referred to as “treatment resistant”. In such cases, a specific treatment plan for this type of patient may need to be developed. A team of mental health professionals and the patient’s primary care physician play important roles in developing such a treatment plan.

Three phases of treatment are generally used for dissociative identity disorder. These three phases include:

1) stabilization, 2) trauma-focused therapy, and 3) integration.

Conclusion: Dissociative disorders are a complex, but treatable form of mental illness. If you or someone you know is suffering from this condition, don’t hesitate to contact our doctors today for help. We can provide treatment options that will best suit your needs and circumstances.Dissociative disorders

Bipolar Disorder and It’s Treatments

Bipolar disorder

Bipolar disorder is a mental disorder that causes mood swings between mania and depression. Bipolar disorder can be treated with medication or therapy, but it’s important to remember that bipolar treatment also involves lifestyle changes in order to maintain the positive effects of these treatments. Bipolar disorder is not curable, but it can be managed through treatment. In this blog post, we will discuss how bipolar treatments work, what they are used for, and when you should seek out additional help if your symptoms persist.

People who do not have bipolar disorder may experience mood changes. Bipolar disorder, on the other hand, is a more severe form of this condition that affects both emotions and behavior. People with bipolar disorder have mood swings ranging from extreme highs, known as mania or hypomania, to depressive lows.

In order for a diagnosis of bipolar disorder to be made, someone must experience at least one episode of mania and depression that lasts at least two weeks each. In addition, these episodes cannot be caused by other illnesses like schizophrenia, drug abuse problems such as cocaine or methamphetamine use , medical conditions like thyroid disease, epilepsy or pregnancy.

Bipolar disorder usually begins in the late teens to early adulthood and is more common in women than men. It can also be genetic since it tends to run in families . Since bipolar disorder causes extreme changes in emotions and behavior, managing these changes is an important part of bipolar treatment.

Types of Bipolar disorder treatments

There are two types of Bipolar disorder:

  1. Bipolar I disorder
  2. Bipolar II disorder

Symptoms of bipolar I disorder include:

-One or more manic episodes that last at least a week and can be severe enough to require hospitalization.

-One or more depressive episodes lasting two weeks or longer, with no manic symptoms between these low periods.

Bipolar II disorder is less intense than bipolar I disorder because the highs and lows do not happen as quickly.

-Only one or more hypomanic episodes with no manic symptoms that last at least four days, but less than a week.

-One or more major depressive episodes lasting two weeks or longer without any manic (or mixed) periods in between these low times. Bipolar II disorder is often missed or misdiagnosed because hypomania can feel good and people may not realize they have a problem.

Treatment for bipolar I disorder usually includes medication such as mood stabilizers, antipsychotics (medication to treat psychotic disorders like schizophrenia), antidepressants or antianxiety medications . Therapy is also an important part of treatment since it helps with managing symptoms and learning how to cope with them.

Treatment for bipolar II disorder usually involves a combination of therapy and medication, including mood stabilizers , antidepressants, anti anxiety medications or antipsychotics . Bipolar I Disorder may need additional treatment beyond what bipolar II disorder might require if the person experiences psychotic symptoms like hallucinations or delusions that do not respond to medication.

Treatment of Bipolar disorder

Bipolar disorder is a serious condition that requires ongoing treatment, but it can be managed with proper bipolar treatments. It’s important for people living with this mental health issue to seek out the right level of help or support they need from family and friends as well as medical professionals who are experienced in treating bipolar disorders.

Treatments for this condition generally involve mood stabilizers, antipsychotic medications and antidepressants . Mood stabilizers help to control the highs and lows associated with bipolar disorder while also preventing future episodes. Antipsychotic medications reduce the manic behaviors that are common in people who have bipolar disorder by blocking dopamine receptors in the brain. Antidepressants are prescribed for bipolar depression, which is usually more severe than regular depression and can lead to suicidal thoughts if left untreated.

​If you suspect that you or someone you know may be suffering from this condition it’s important not to ignore these symptoms . Instead, seek out medical help so your doctor can determine exactly what type of condition you have and how to best treat it.

If a person who has bipolar disorder does not seek treatment, they can experience serious consequences including job loss, trouble with the law or even suicide . In order to avoid these issues, people should work closely with their doctor so that they can get on track towards healthier living as soon as possible.

It’s important to remember that bipolar disorder is a manageable condition and can be treated through various forms of therapy including medication, lifestyle changes and psychological counseling . The most effective way for people with this condition to manage their symptoms is by working closely with their doctors in order to find the right combination of medications and therapies that work best for them.

Conclusion: It’s important to remember that bipolar treatment also involves lifestyle changes in order to maintain the positive effects of these treatments. Bipolar disorder is not curable, but it can be managed through treatment. In this blog post we discussed how bipolar treatments work and what they are used for as well as when you should seek out additional help if your symptoms persist.

We hope you found the information helpful! If you would like guidance on your specific needs or want more information about any of our services please contact us today.

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