Hoarding disorder With its symptoms and treatments

Hoarding disorder

Hoarding disorder has been around for centuries. Hoarding is a mental health condition that causes an individual to accumulate items in their home to excess, and they may even have trouble throwing away any of the items.

Hoarders often face many challenges related to this disorder including difficulty organizing their home, acquiring new possessions, and maintaining relationships with others due to clutter. This blog post will discuss hoarding symptoms, treatments, how it effects children living at home.

The overall incidence of hoarding disorder is about 2.6%. Hoarding disorder is more common in older adults. Hoarders are often well aware that their behavior causes problems, but they still have difficulty getting rid of items because parting with them produces too much anxiety for the hoarder to handle. Some people who suffer from hoarding disorder also face depression or other mental illnesses such as OCD or ADHD which can make treatment more complicated. Hoarders often feel a strong sense of responsibility to take care of the items they hoard, but this obligation makes it difficult for the person to discard their possessions.

Children who live with someone that has hoarding disorder can have a very hard time living in such an environment due to all the clutter and filth caused by so much stuff. Parents with this disorder often face difficulties disciplining their children because they do not want to part with any of the items that may be required for punishment, which can lead to an unhealthy parent-child relationship.

Consequences

Hoarding may harm relationships with others to the point where it may be difficult for an individual with this disorder to sustain friendships.

Hoarding can also cause issues at work if too much clutter causes a person’s workspace or office to become unusable in any way, shape, or form which leads them to lose their job due to being unable perform necessary tasks required by the company.

Diagnosis

There are no tests to diagnose a patient with hoarding disorder; however, there are specific criteria that must be met in order for the individual to receive this diagnosis.

Hoarding is often diagnosed using an interview or questionnaire where mental health professionals ask questions about how much difficulty the person has throwing away items and why they haven’t been able to do so.

Hoarding can also be diagnosed using a mental health survey that evaluates the person’s level of hoarding behavior, including how many items they have and why they haven’t disposed of them yet.

Symptoms

symptoms include:

– difficulty getting rid of items and acquiring new ones because it causes too much anxiety

– trouble organizing possessions, which often leads to piles or stacks of clutter everywhere in the home causing an obstacle for walking through rooms.  This may cause some people to develop health issues such as asthma from breathing in dust particles or other harmful materials that could be present in the home.

– acquiring items that may not be needed or for which there is no space to store them, causing clutter and disorganization throughout the house.

– feeling a strong sense of responsibility to take care of many things that most people would find unnecessary such as newspapers from years past or broken appliances with missing pieces rendering them useless.

– hoarding causes severe distress or problems in one’s daily life, such as being unable to cook dinner because of an overabundance of items that are cluttering the kitchen, causing the oven and stove top to be unusable.

Causes and risk factors

We don’t know what causes this condition, but it is likely that heredity plays a role, as the risk of developing hoarding disorder increases if other family members have this condition.

Hoarding behavior can also be caused by brain injuries or damage to specific regions in the brain which are associated with decision making and reasoning abilities.

There may also be environmental factors that contribute to the onset of hoarding disorder including the environment in which a child grows up. For example, if children are exposed to an overabundance of items at home because their parents hoard too much stuff, then they may develop this condition themselves when they become adults.

Example: Hoarders often feel a strong sense of responsibility to take care of many things that most people would find unnecessary.

These items can cause a lot of clutter and disorganization throughout the house which often leads to piles or stacks of clutter everywhere in the home causing an obstacle for walking through rooms. This may cause some people to develop health issues such as asthma from breathing in dust particles or other harmful materials that could be present in the home.

Hoarding can also cause issues at work if too much clutter causes a person’s workspace or office to become unusable in any way, shape, or form which leads them to lose their job due to being unable perform necessary tasks required by the company.

Hoarding disorder With its symptoms

Treatments

Treatment for this disorder includes Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), medication, or both as treatment options. CBT is often the preferred treatment option for this disorder because it does not have the same side effects that medication can.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy focuses on changing a person’s thoughts and beliefs about themselves, their possessions, or anything else that might cause them to hoard items excessively. A therapist can use this treatment option to help a person identify why they are hoarding and help them understand how their thoughts, feelings, and behaviors impact each other.

A therapist will work with the person to come up with specific goals for themselves such as donating items that don’t bring joy or giving things away to charity rather than keeping it all for themselves which can help the person feel better about their home and work space.

The therapist will also teach a patient different strategies to change how they think about their possessions or things that are no longer useful in order for them to be able to part with items without feeling guilty or anxious. They may also use cognitive restructuring techniques where they ask why or how a person feels about themselves or their items which can help them to understand the value of why they are holding onto things that no longer have purpose.

 Medication

Medication is often prescribed when CBT alone has failed to help the patient recover from this disorder.

There are three different types of medication used to treat this disorder: antidepressants, anti-anxiety medications and psychostimulants.

Antidepressants work by increasing the levels of serotonin in the brain which can help a person feel less anxious about letting go of items that they may not need anymore or it could cause someone with OCD to stop thinking about items or objects that they feel the need to hoard.

Anti Anxiety medications work by blocking a chemical in our brain called GABA which helps us not be as stressed out when we think about letting go of things that are no longer useful and it can help people with this condition reduce their anxiety around getting rid of these unnecessary possessions.

Psychostimulants work similarly to antianxiety medications by blocking GABA and making it easier for people with this disorder to let go of things that they may not need anymore.

We want to help. If you’re reading this and struggle with hoarding, we know what it’s like and that there is hope for a better life. Our team of doctors are ready and waiting to provide treatment plans tailored specifically for your needs or those of your loved one who may be struggling with the disorder. Contact us today if you need assistance getting started on the path towards recovery!

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